In response to the need for nurses after the Civil War, philanthropist Louisa Lee Schuyler established a nursing school at Bellevue Hospital in 1873 — the very first nursing school in the United States. Since that time, the demand for nurses has continued to grow. As of 2018, registered nurses are the largest sector of the health care profession in the state — and the field is continuing to grow. After matriculating at one of the many nursing schools founded in the footsteps of Schuyler, modern-day nurses can find employment in a variety of healthcare facilities in New York, including hospitals, community care facilities and nursing homes.

This page includes information on the nursing profession in New York, such as how aspiring nurses can get training, earn a license, and keep abreast of developments in the field.

Best Nursing Schools in New York

With 109 nursing schools in New York, it can be difficult to know where to go to learn the skills that employers today expect of their nurses. To help prospective nurses weigh their education options based on the qualities they want in a school, we have created a list of the best undergraduate nursing programs in New York, based on data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). In addition, we have ranked the best graduate schools for nursing in the state, a ranking that may be of use to nurses in New York looking to specialize in a specific area of the field.

Continue reading for our evaluations of New York’s best nursing schools. (Information about our ranking methodology is available at the bottom of this page.)

01
New York University
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
3
Undergraduate tuition
$46,590
Undergraduate graduation rate
85%
Undergraduate retention rate
93%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
58%
02
SUNY College at Plattsburgh
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$6,470
Undergraduate graduation rate
63%
Undergraduate retention rate
80%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
97%
03
LIU Brooklyn
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
3
Undergraduate tuition
$34,352
Undergraduate graduation rate
33%
Undergraduate retention rate
61%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
96%
04
D'Youville College
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
3
Undergraduate tuition
$24,740
Undergraduate graduation rate
45%
Undergraduate retention rate
81%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
98%
05
SUNY College of Technology at Canton
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$6,470
Undergraduate graduation rate
36%
Undergraduate retention rate
71%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
97%
06
Monroe College
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$13,560
Undergraduate graduation rate
53%
Undergraduate retention rate
80%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
95%
07
Molloy College
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$28,000
Undergraduate graduation rate
76%
Undergraduate retention rate
85%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
98%
08
University of Rochester
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$49,260
Undergraduate graduation rate
85%
Undergraduate retention rate
96%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
90%
09
SUNY College of Technology at Alfred
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$6,470
Undergraduate graduation rate
48%
Undergraduate retention rate
69%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
98%
10
SUNY College of Technology at Delhi
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$6,470
Undergraduate graduation rate
41%
Undergraduate retention rate
73%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
96%
01
New York University
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
25
Graduate Tuition
$39,936
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
02
Stony Brook University
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
15
Graduate Tuition
$10,870
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
14
03
University at Buffalo
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
13
Graduate Tuition
$10,870
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
7
04
SUNY at Binghamton
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
11
Graduate Tuition
$10,870
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
05
CUNY Hunter College
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
11
Graduate Tuition
$10,130
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
06
University of Rochester
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
15
Graduate Tuition
$36,912
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
07
CUNY Lehman College
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
5
Graduate Tuition
$10,130
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
08
Molloy College
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
8
Graduate Tuition
$19,170
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
09
The Sage Colleges
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
5
Graduate Tuition
$12,240
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
10
Saint John Fisher College
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
4
Graduate Tuition
$15,930
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0

Nursing Accreditation in New York

Different students look for different qualities in a nursing school. Some students are most interested in location; others may look at tuition costs first; while some are concerned about the student-teacher ratio. No matter what students want in their ideal nursing school, they should always keep accreditation in mind during their search.

Accredited schools are required to go through a rigorous approval process in order to earn this important designation — a process where the quality of their education is judged against U.S.-wide standards. With this in mind, prospective nursing students should only look for schools that have been accredited by official organizations such as:

  • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
  • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing
  • Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education
  • Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs

New York Nursing Licensure

Completing a degree program is only one step in the process of becoming a nurse. In order to work in the state, New York requires that registered nurses earn a license. This entails getting a passing grade on the NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination), answering questions that demonstrate high moral character, and paying the New York State Education Department a $143 fee. Similarly, those who want to become a licensed practical nurse are required to pass the NCLEX-PN (National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses), pay the state’s application fee, and answer the required moral character questions.

Registered nurses who want to advance in their careers to become a nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist must obtain a certification in order to land those jobs. Nurse practitioners in New York are expected to complete a nurse practitioner education program; meet pharmacology education requirements by passing a state-approved pharmacotherapeutics exam or a nationally-recognized nurse midwife or physician assistant examination; and pay a fee of $85. To obtain a clinical nurse specialist certification, professionals must complete a clinical nurse practice master’s degree program and pay an $80 fee.

For more information about nursing licenses in New York, log on to www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/.

New York Nursing organizations

The demands of the field require nurses to be lifelong learners. One way nurses can keep up with medical and healthcare developments, as well as connect with one another, is by joining professional associations. The following are some nursing organizations in New York that people may be interested in becoming a part of.

  • With a membership 42,000 nurses strong as of 2018, the New York State Nurses Association is dedicated to strengthening nursing practice in the state and making the workplace better. Members can take advantage of the organization’s workshops, continuing education courses, and practice resources.

  • Professionals who join the American Psychiatric Nurses Association automatically become members of the New York chapter of the organization. Psychiatric nurses who join can participate in regional activities and are offered access to a board with job leads from around the state.

  • Nursing students and working professionals alike can benefit from being a member of this association, which boasts perks such as access to the group’s professional journals and other publications, networking events, education programs, and mentoring services. In addition, the organization acts as the voice of nurse practitioners in New York by advocating on their behalf to the state legislature.

  • From Suffolk County to Niagara Falls and everywhere in between, nurses who provide emergency care in New York can find support from the New York State Emergency Nurses Association. Members of the organization can attend an annual conference, receive the latest information about the industry from the association’s newsletter, and take continuing education courses.

New York-Specific Continuing Education

In order to keep their credentials valid, nurses in New York are required to complete five hours of continuing education coursework from a state-approved provider. Courses may cover topics such as public health law, infection control, palliative medicine, pain management, end of life care, and addiction.

Hospitals in New York

According to a report by the Center for Health Workforce Studies, the majority of New York’s nurses are employed by hospitals. And with 172 hospitals around the state, there are many places for nurses to choose from when looking for a position. The following are some of the hospitals in the Empire State that employ nurses.

  • New York-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center (New York) Part of this hospital’s reputation as a provider and training center is built on its many specialized care centers, which offer unique opportunities for research and healthcare. For example, the Brain and Spine Center and the Center for Advanced Digestive Care are known for the groundbreaking, minimally-invasive procedures they provide.
  • Montefiore Hospital-Moses Campus (Bronx) Founded in 1884, Montefiore Hospital began its operations by treating tuberculosis patients. Since then, the facility has grown in size, function and diversity. For example, the Moses Campus houses an AIDS Center and a Stroke Center that are designated by the state, as well as several Montefiore Einstein Centers of Excellence, i.e. the Center for Heart and Vascular Care and the Center for Transplantation.
  • Long Island Jewish Medical Center (New Hyde Park) Long Island Jewish Medical Center prides itself on delivering compassionate healthcare through its multiple facilities, which specialize in fields such as obstetrics, cardiology, oncology and dentistry. The hospital also strives to give back to the community through programs designed to help people who are unable to pay for healthcare services, as well as its support for veterans.
Sources & Methodology

Methodology

Using the National Center for Education Statistics’ Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), we ranked 6,758 United States institutions with two different methodologies, in order to create two different lists: our undergraduate list and our graduate list. Final data for the 2016-17 school year was used for these rankings. (Schools that did not provide data for all 11 criteria were disqualified from the ranking.)

The 11 criteria for the undergraduate school ranking were as follows:

  1. Number of associate-level degree programs offered to nursing-related majors
  2. Number of associate-level nursing-related degree programs offered via distance education
  3. Variety of associate-level nursing-related degree programs offered
  4. Tuition
  5. Retention rate
  6. Graduation rate
  7. Average amount of federal grant aid awarded to full-time first-time undergraduates
  8. Percent of full-time first-time undergraduates awarded any financial aid
  9. Credit offerings (Military, Dual, Life Experience, AP)
  10. Services (Career Counseling, Placement Services)
  11. Availability of tuition plans (Guaranteed, Prepaid, Payment, Other)

The graduate school ranking scored schools based on 9 criteria, different from the undergraduate list. These 9 criteria were as follows:

  1. Number of master’s-level degree programs offered to nursing-related majors
  2. Number of master’s-level nursing-related degree programs offered via distance education
  3. Variety of master’s-level nursing-related degree programs offered
  4. Tuition
  5. Retention rate
  6. Graduation rate
  7. Credit offerings (Military, Dual, Life Experience, AP)
  8. Services (Career Counseling, Placement Services)
  9. Availability of tuition plans (Guaranteed, Prepaid, Payment, Other)

All schools were scored on a 10-point scale for each of the points listed above. Individual data point scores were then multiplied by their respective weights, and the scores were added together, for a maximum possible score of 10 points.

NOTE: Schools’ tuition amounts are based on 2016-17 undergraduate and graduate data reported to the National Center for Education Statistics. The actual cost of tuition may vary.

 

Sources

  1. Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) 2016-17, National Center for Education Statistics, Accessed January 2018, http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/
  2. American Hospital Directory, Accessed June 2018, https://www.ahd.com/
  3. Supply and Demand Projections of the Nursing Workforce: 2014-2030, HRSA, Accessed July 2018, https://bhw.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/bhw/nchwa/projections/NCHWA_HRSA_Nursing_Report.pdf
  4. Columbia University School of Nursing, Accessed July 2018, http://nursing.columbia.edu
  5. A Profile of Registered Nurses in New York State, New York Alliance for Careers In Healthcare, Accessed July 2018, http://nyachnyc.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/CHWS-RN-Profile-2016.pdf
  6. Finding Women in the Archives: Student Nurses, NY Historical Society, Accessed July 2018, http://behindthescenes.nyhistory.org/new-york-city-nurses/
  7. Monroe College, Accessed July 2018, https://www.monroecollege.edu
  8. School of Health Professions, New York Institute of Technology, Accessed July 2018, https://www.nyit.edu/health_professions
  9. NYS Office of the Professions, Accessed July 2018, http://www.op.nysed.gov
  10. Continuing Education, New York State Nurses Association, Accessed July 2018, https://www.nysna.org/nursing-practice/continuing-education
  11. New York: Board of Nursing CE Requirements, Nurse.com, Accessed July 2018, https://www.nurse.com/state-nurse-ce-requirements/new-york
  12. New York Nursing Continuing Education Requirements, CE Express, Accessed July 2018, http://www.ce-express.com/Nursing-CE-Requirements/New-York-Nurses
  13. New York State Nurses Association, Accessed July 2018, https://www.nysna.org/
  14. American Psychiatric Nurses Association New York Chapter, Accessed July 2018, https://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=3414
  15. Nurse Practitioner Association New York State, Accessed July 2018, https://www.thenpa.org/
  16. New York State Emergency Nurses Association, Accessed July 2018, http://www.nysena.org/
  17. New York-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center, Accessed July 2018, https://www.nyp.org/
  18. Montefiore Hospital-Moses Campus, Accessed July 2018, http://www.montefiore.org/
  19. Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Accessed July 2018, https://www.northwell.edu/find-care/locations/long-island-jewish-medical-center
  20. The Health Care Workforce in New York, 2015-2016, Center for Health Workforce Studies, Accessed July 2018, http://www.chwsny.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/NY_Tracking_Report_2016.pdf
  21. How many hospitals does each state have?, Becker’s Hospital Review, Accessed July 2018, https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-transactions-and-valuation/how-many-hospitals-does-each-state-have.html

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