With approximately 626,000 people, Vermont is one of the smallest states in the US by population. But despite this small size, Vermont mirrors many other states in that there is currently a huge demand for nurses and other medical professionals. One of the reasons for this demand is that even though Vermont’s overall population is expected to drop by 0.9 percent from 2015 to 2030, the number of individuals aged 65 and older is expected to grow by 50 percent.

Most of the demand is likely to arise from residential care and nursing home settings, although registered nurses may find more employment in hospitals. In fact, in 2017, Vermont hospitals reported a 9.5 percent vacancy rate for part-time and full-time registered nursing positions. It’s not just registered nurses who are likely to be in high demand. There is a need for licensed practical nurses and advanced practice nurses, too. If you’re interested in finding out more about the nursing profession in Vermont, read on.

Featured Nursing Schools in Vermont

Vermont Badge ImageThe state of Vermont is home to 5 nursing schools. With multiple high-quality institutions to choose from, it can make finding a specific Vermont nursing school to attend a complicated task. To help with this search process, we’ve collected data on the nursing schools in Vermont using the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and displayed it below in two lists: one for undergraduate programs and one for graduate programs.

Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$10,872
Undergraduate graduation rate
54%
Undergraduate retention rate
70%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
92%
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
1
Undergraduate tuition
$15,504
Undergraduate graduation rate
75%
Undergraduate retention rate
86%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
95%
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
2
Undergraduate tuition
$13,512
Undergraduate graduation rate
52%
Undergraduate retention rate
66%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
93%
Number of undergraduate-level nursing programs offered
1
Undergraduate tuition
$36,554
Undergraduate graduation rate
59%
Undergraduate retention rate
79%
Percent of undergrad students awarded financial aid
100%
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
1
Graduate Tuition
$15,504
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered
0
Graduate Tuition
$17,928
Number of graduate-level nursing programs offered through distance education
0

Nursing Accreditation in Vermont

Accreditation can provide verification that a school’s students can gain a certain amount of knowledge and the requisite skills from their degree program. Anyone interested in becoming a licensed nurse in Vermont should consider attending only an accredited nursing program.

NursingDegrees only lists accredited schools or programs, but for those interested in a school not on this website, or those who would like to confirm accreditation on their own, please look for a Vermont nursing program that has been accredited by one of the following accrediting bodies:

  • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN)
  • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)

Vermont Nursing Licensure

Vermont is like other states in that licensure is required to become a nurse. Licensed nursing assistants must graduate from a nursing assistant program and pass the national Nurse Aid Assessment Program exam.

To become a licensed practical nurse, or LPN, an individual must graduate from an LPN program and pass the NCLEX-PN.

Registered nurses (RN) have a similar requirement, including completion of a registered nursing program, either at the associate (ADN) or bachelor’s (BSN) level, plus passage of the NCLEX-RN exam.

Those seeking the highest levels of nursing practice may wish to become advanced practice registered nurses, or APRNs. To become an APRN, an individual must already be an RN and complete a graduate level nursing program, as well as obtain an advanced nursing certification. For further details, please visit Vermont’s nursing licensing website.

Vermont Nursing organizations

In nursing, networking can play a valuable role in professional advancement. In addition, nursing is a field where learning is continuous. Luckily, there are several nursing organizations that allow nurses to achieve both these goals. To learn more about organizations for nurses in Vermont, check out the following list.

  • American Nurses Association Vermont (ANAV):

    This professional organization represents the interest of all nurses in Vermont by providing opportunities for continuing education, legislative advocacy, publication of the Vermont Nurses Connection publication and nursing scholarships for aspiring nurses.

  • Vermont State School Nurses’ Association (VSSNA):

    For nurses specializing in providing nursing care within the academic setting, the VSSNA exists to advance the interests of not only school nurses, but the students whom they serve. Resources include continuing education, information for members on state regulations and laws and administration of programs to improve the health of school children.

  • Vermont Nurse Practitioners Association (VNPA):

    For nurses practicing at the highest level, there is the VNPA. Its mission is to help nurse practitioners in Vermont by providing a means for them to influence the healthcare and nursing policy-making process in the state of Vermont. Additional resources include providing continuing educational opportunities, facilitate professional training and offer mentoring services to nursing students.

Vermont-Specific Continuing Education

Vermont is one of the few states where there is no formal continuing education requirement for nurses to maintain licensure. The only exception to this rule applies to APRNs who have a registration number with the US Drug Enforcement Administration or dispense controlled substances. These nurses must complete two credits of continuing education by the time they wish to renew their nursing license. These credits may be completed through online or in-person classes. For further information, please visit the Vermont professional licensure website for nurses.

Hospitals in Vermont

Hospitals serve as one of the primary employment destinations for both fresh nursing school graduates and experienced advanced practice nurses or nurse practitioners (NP). And when it comes to RNs, hospitals are their largest single employer in Vermont. But hospitals can also play a part in the nursing education process, providing opportunities for Vermont nursing students to gain hands-on experience through practicums or clinicals. Three of the most prominent hospitals in Vermont include:

  • The University of Vermont Medical Center (Burlington): The University of Vermont Medical Center serves as a teaching ground for both medical school and nursing students, given its affiliation with the University of Vermont. This is actually a health care system with featured services including women’s health, cancer, children’s hospitals and orthopedics.
  • Rutland Regional Medical Center (Rutland): Also known as Rutland Regional, the Rutland Regional Medical Center is a 144-bed hospital with more than 1,900 employees offering health care services in 37 areas of specialization. In 2018, Rutland Regional accommodated more than 33,000 emergency room visits and 330 births.
  • Southwestern Vermont Health Care (Bennington):Southwestern Vermont Healthcare (SVHC) is comprised of various facilities serving the citizens of not just Vermont, but also Massachusetts and New York. Started in 1918 with just 30 beds, SVHC is now made up of six health care facilities, including a 99-bed hospital, 150-bed nursing home, a cancer treatment center and three primary care campuses.
Sources & Methodology

Methodology

Using the National Center for Education Statistics’ Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), we gathered data for 6,758 United States institutions. We then filtered that list of schools by state and analyzed the data for each state with two different methodologies, in order to create two different lists: our undergraduate list, based on 11 ranking criteria, and our graduate list, based on 9 ranking criteria.

Final data for the 2016-17 school year was used for these rankings. Schools that did not provide data for all of the required ranking criteria were disqualified from that ranking.

The 11 criteria for the undergraduate school ranking were as follows:

  1. Number of associate- and bachelor’s-level degree programs offered to nursing-related majors
  2. Number of associate- and bachelor’s-level nursing-related degree programs offered via distance education
  3. Variety of associate- and bachelor’s-level nursing-related degree programs offered
  4. Tuition
  5. Retention rate
  6. Graduation rate
  7. Average amount of federal grant aid awarded to full-time first-time undergraduates
  8. Percent of full-time first-time undergraduates awarded any financial aid
  9. Credit offerings (Military, Dual, Life Experience, AP)
  10. Services (Career Counseling, Placement Services)
  11. Availability of tuition plans (Guaranteed, Prepaid, Payment, Other)

The graduate school ranking scored schools based on 9 criteria, different from the undergraduate list. These 9 criteria were as follows:

  1. Number of master’s- and doctoral-level degree programs offered to nursing-related majors
  2. Number of master’s- and doctoral-level nursing-related degree programs offered via distance education
  3. Variety of master’s- and doctoral-level nursing-related degree programs offered
  4. Tuition
  5. Retention rate
  6. Graduation rate
  7. Credit offerings (Military, Dual, Life Experience, AP)
  8. Services (Career Counseling, Placement Services)
  9. Availability of tuition plans (Guaranteed, Prepaid, Payment, Other)

All schools were scored on a 10-point scale for each of the points listed above. Individual data point scores were then multiplied by their respective weights, and the scores were added together, for a maximum possible score of 10 points.

NOTE: Schools’ tuition amounts are based on 2016-17 undergraduate and graduate data reported to the National Center for Education Statistics. The actual cost of tuition may vary.

 

Sources

  1. American Hospital Directory, Accessed September 2019, https://www.ahd.com/
  2. US Census Bureau, QuickFacts, Vermont, Accessed September 2019, https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/VT
  3. Vermont’s Future of Nursing, 2017 Data Dashboard, Accessed September 2019, http://contentmanager.med.uvm.edu/docs/final_2017_ahec_nursing_data_dashboard_final/ahec-documents/final_2017_ahec_nursing_data_dashboard_final.pdf?sfvrsn=2
  4. Vermont General Assembly, Chapter 28: Nursing, Accessed September 2019, https://legislature.vermont.gov/statutes/fullchapter/26/028
  5. Vermont, Secretary of State, Nursing, Accessed September 2019, https://www.sec.state.vt.us/professional-regulation/list-of-professions/nursing.aspx

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